top of page

Difference Between Baking Powder and Baking Soda

The main difference between baking powder and baking soda is their chemical composition and how they react in recipes. Baking soda is pure sodium bicarbonate while baking powder is a mixture of sodium bicarbonate and an acid-like cream of tartar. 


Baking soda requires an acidic ingredient, such as buttermilk or cocoa powder, to activate and create carbon dioxide gas, which helps baked goods rise. 


Baking powder, on the other hand, already contains acid and can be used without additional acidic ingredients. Baking powder requires moisture and heat to activate while baking soda reacts immediately with acidic ingredients. Using the wrong leavening agent in a recipe can affect the texture and flavor of the baked goods. 


Here are some key differences between baking powder and baking soda.


Overview and Key Difference


Baking powder and baking soda are both leavening agents used in baking to help dough or batter rise. While they serve a similar purpose, they have distinct differences in composition and how they react in recipes.


What is Baking Powder?


Difference Between Baking Powder and Baking Soda

Baking powder is a leavening agent made up of a combination of baking soda, an acid (such as cream of tartar), and a stabilizer (such as cornstarch). It is designed to create a reaction when exposed to moisture and heat. Baking powder is “double-acting,” meaning it releases carbon dioxide gas twice: once when it gets wet, and again when it is exposed to heat in the oven.

  • Contains sodium bicarbonate and an acid

  • Can be used without additional acidic ingredients

  • Requires moisture and heat to activate

  • Used in recipes that don’t feature an acidic ingredient


What is Baking Soda?


Difference Between Baking Powder and Baking Soda

Baking soda, also known as sodium bicarbonate, is a pure alkaline compound. It needs an acid and a liquid to create a reaction and release carbon dioxide gas. Baking soda is a “single-acting” leavening agent, meaning it only produces gas when it comes into contact with acidic ingredients, such as buttermilk, lemon juice, or vinegar.


  • Contains pure sodium bicarbonate

  • Requires an acidic ingredient to activate

  • Reacts immediately with acidic ingredients

  • Used in recipes that feature an acidic ingredient



Side-by-Side Comparison – Difference Between Baking Powder and Baking Soda:


Key Factors

Baking Powder

Baking Soda

Composition

Baking soda + Acid + Stabilizer

Sodium bicarbonate (pure alkaline compound)

Reaction

Double-acting

Single-acting

Carbon Dioxide Release

Reacts with moisture and heat

Reacts with acid and liquid

Acid Requirement

Contains acid components

Requires acidic ingredients for reaction

Common Uses

Recipes without acidic ingredients

Recipes with acidic ingredients

Neutralizing Agent

Not a strong neutralizer

Strong neutralizer for acidic ingredients


Chemical Composition


  • Baking Soda (Sodium Bicarbonate): Baking soda is a pure chemical compound, consisting of sodium bicarbonate. It requires an acid to activate its leavening properties.

  • Baking Powder: Baking powder, on the other hand, is a combination of an acid (usually cream of tartar) and a base (usually baking soda). Some baking powders also contain a starch component to prevent clumping.


pH Levels


  • Baking Soda: Baking soda has a high pH level, which can affect the browning and Maillard reaction in baked goods. It is often used in recipes where a more alkaline environment is desired, such as in certain types of cookies.

  • Baking Powder: Baking powder is generally pH-neutral, making it suitable for a wide range of recipes without significantly impacting the pH of the final product.

Storage Considerations


  • Baking Soda: Baking soda is stable and has a longer shelf life. It can be stored in a cool, dry place for an extended period without losing its leavening properties.

  • Baking Powder: Baking powder contains both an acid and a base, and over time, it can lose its potency, especially if exposed to moisture. It's advisable to check the expiration date on the packaging and store it in a cool, dry environment.

Common Mistakes


  • Baking Soda: Using too much baking soda can result in an overly alkaline taste and a soapy flavor in the final product.

  • Baking Powder: Using expired or insufficient baking powder can lead to inadequate rising, resulting in dense and heavy baked goods.


Conclusion


Baking powder and baking soda are both leavening agents used in baking, but they differ in composition and reaction. Baking powder is a combination of baking soda, acid, and stabilizer, and it releases carbon dioxide gas twice during the baking process. Baking soda, on the other hand, is a pure alkaline compound that requires acid and liquid to create a reaction and release gas. Understanding the differences between these leavening agents is important for achieving the desired results in baking recipes.

bottom of page